Here’s how you can catch the longest lunar eclipse of the century

Remember that super blue moon/blood moon in January? Sure, it was gorgeous, but it’s got nothing on the upcoming lunar eclipse in terms of duration.

This Saturday, 28 July, we’ll see the longest lunar eclipse of the 21st century as the moon passes through the Earth’s shadow for four hours. The total eclipse will last one hour and 43 minutes, just short of the longest theoretical limit of a lunar eclipse, which is one hour and 47 minutes.

Longest lunar eclipse of the century
A few lucky regions around the world will enjoy a spectacular bloodmoon this week. Photo: Sam McJunkin/Unsplash

From what we understand, the best places to enjoy full visibility of the phenomenon from start to end is east Africa, the Middle East, India, and the westernmost region of China. What’s more, if you have clear skies, you’ll see Mars as a bright red dot by the blood moon.

Unfortunately, most of North America, Mexico and Greenland will miss out on this celestial show (sorry, guys).

We pinpoint some of our favourite places in the world where the eclipse can be seen, with the exact local time and the direction in which to point your cameras.

Singapore
Full eclipse: 3.30am to 5.13am, 28 July 2018
Where to look: West-southwest

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Full eclipse: 3.30am to 5.13am, 28 July 2018
Where to look: West-southwest

Bali, Indonesia
Full eclipse: 3.30am to 5.13am, 28 July 2018
Where to look: West-southwest

Koh Samui, Thailand
Full eclipse: 2.30am to 4.13am, 28 July 2018
Where to look: Southwest

Hong Kong
Full eclipse: 3.30am to 5.13am, 28 July 2018
Where to look: West-southwest

Manila, Philippines
Full eclipse: 3.30am to 5.13am, 28 July 2018
Where to look: West-southwest

Malé, Maldives
Full eclipse: 12.30am to 2.13am, 28 July 2018
Where to look: South-southwest

London, United Kingdom
Full visible eclipse: 9.21pm to 10.13pm, 27 July 2018
Where to look: Southeast, close to the horizon

Sydney, Australia
Full visible eclipse: 5.30am to 6.21am, 28 July 2018
Where to look: West-southwest, close to the horizon

Looking for another vantage point? Find more information about the lunar eclipse in your city here.

Read also: Most popular destinations for solo female travellers

Read also: The 2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer winners will blow your mind

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Andrea Tim

Andrea is a serial kopi peng drinker (for fun, not for the caffeine; coffee doesn't wake her up) and believer in keyboard shortcuts. She sees The Dress as blue and black, and hears both Yanny and Laurel. Make of that what you will.

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